Capitalism is over

The bar for the makeability of one’s own life is too high. People need to check all kind of boxes and follow strict operation protocols to be accepted or to receive a positive rating on executing their job. The rampant system requirements are more and more in friction with the human sense of desire & meaning. This regulatory pressure makes people sick.

Burn-outs have become too common and even if you don’t have one yourself, you may feel meaningless anyway. Next to that, Millennials (born in 1977 through 1994) are the first generation in modern memory to be worse of than their parents: they will have a lower income and increasing student debt. This makes Millennials increasingly believe capitalism is not the way forward.

A silent Force awakens
“The sheer beauty of this is that nothing fuels this movement more than capitalism’s own troubles, and the displeasure, disaffection, and anxiety it produces,” – Richard Wolff 1). The silent, pragmatic majority is activating. This is a powerful new force growing, yet unseen as it is still under the radar. Nobody desires an incoherent society. Even major investors call out to companies to have a strong social purpose. As money is coming into the game, this process is accelerating. It is time for a value shift.

The new balance
Isolating yourself to free yourself from being compared with others (i.e. on social media and the selfie movement) is not a sustainable solution. It is not productive and missing your holistic view & feeling of contribution.

More and more people are accepting the reality: the world we live in is an imperfect world, permanently sub-optimal. In this world you should be a we-person: building trust with people around you by giving them positive charges (circle of influence), a strong sense of your congruent self, combined with serving other’s values and goals. This makes both of you move forward in your own missions and feel thankful & satisfied.

Sicco Maathuis | Sergeant Seamless

 

1) Richard Wolff is professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University in New York.

 

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